Saturday, December 07, 2019

Remember Pearl Harbor

Remember Pearl Harbor

That was the battle cry of WW II. President Roosevelt (FDR) said, “Sunday, December 7, 1941, a day that will live in infamy”. Not many are alive who remember that fateful morning when the attack took place on our Pacific Fleet as it lay at anchor. Those who were there will never forget and others will never forget it or where they were when they heard the news.

As we commemorate this anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack, a thought comes to mind. Will “Remember Pearl Harbor”, “Remember the Maine” and “Remember the Alamo” become forgotten or irrelevant? Not because those that were there or were aware of it are gone. But because they have been relegated to the back pages of History books that are routinely ignored by many schools? Will 9/11 and other recent terrorists events someday join them?

Unfortunately, there has been a tremendous cost in the loss of lives in these tragic events. Thank God for our brave troops and first responders who have been involved in them. In this land of plenty and freedoms, with all our problems, people still yearn to come to live here. But remember “Freedom is not free”.

 

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Wednesday, December 04, 2019

Definition of Disinfectants, Germicides, etc.



What are Disinfectants, Germicides, Anti-Microbials, Sanitizers?

Bane-Clene Anti-Microbials



Definitions of Disinfectants, Germicides, Anti-Microbials, Sanitizers, etc.

  • Antibiotic resistance - Bacteria, such as MRSA, adapt to the drugs that are designed to kill them making previously standard treatments for bacterial infections less effective, and in some cases, ineffective.
  • Antibiotics either kill or interfere with the life cycle of bacteria inside the body.
  • Antimicrobials kill a microorganism and are said to be bactericidal.
  • Antiseptics disinfect skin.
  • Bacteria are minute one-celled, microscopic, plant like organisms which multiply by fission and lack chlorophyll. Bacteria are one-celled, vegetable microorganisms that lack the green pigment chlorophyll. 400,000,000 of bacteria cells are the same size as a single grain of granulated sugar.
  • Bactericides or Bactericidal agents destroy bacteria. This term is commonly applied to chemical agents that kill both pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria but not necessarily bacterial spores. The “cidal” and “cide” suffixes comes from the Latin word for kill - such as the words “homicide” and “suicide”. Bactericides must be registered with the EPA. Most bactericides are cationic and may not be used on stain-resistant nylon carpet. In some states, you must be licensed to apply bactericides, sanitizers, etc.
  • Bacteriostatic means that the antimicrobial inhibits bacterial growth but does not kill the bacteria.
  • Biocide is a general term describing a chemical agent, usually broad spectrum, that inactivates microorganisms. Because biocides range in antimicrobial activity, other terms may be more specific, including “-static,” referring to agents which inhibit growth (e.g., bacteriostatic, fungistatic, and sporistatic) and “-cidal,” referring to agents which kill the target organism (e.g., sporicidal, virucidal, and bactericidal).
  • Bleaches - Hydrogen peroxide, which reacts to produce free oxygen radicals and bleaches that are based on chlorine compounds such as chlorine bleach are very powerful oxidizing agents. They quickly oxidize the complex molecules present on the surface of bacteria, causing their cell walls and cell membranes to disrupt.
  • Broad Spectrum Disinfectant are for use against both gram negative and gram positive micro-organisms. Must kill both Salmonella and Staphylococcus.
  • Disinfectants are germicidal agents used to destroy viruses and microbes (germs), such as bacteria and fungi, but not spores and not all viruses. Technically, a disinfectant must be capable of reducing the level of pathogenic bacteria by 99.999% during a time frame greater than 5 but less than 10 minutes.
  • Disinfection is the destruction of pathogenic and other kinds of microorganisms by physical or chemical means.
  • Fungi are eukaryotic organisms that includes microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as the more familiar mushrooms.
  • Germ - A disease causing micro-organism.
  • Germicidal Cleaner - A cleaner capable of cleaning and destroying bacteria in one operation.
  • Germicidal Detergent - An agent that both cleans a surface and kills most germs.
  • Germicide - Applies especially to chemical agents that kill disease germs but not necessarily spores.
  • Gram-Negative Bacteria - Bacteria are separated into two groups when stained with crystal violet dye. Bacteria which will not retain the gram-stain (crystal violet) counter stain are gram negative (gram positive to retain the stain). Gram negative bacteria are somewhat more resistant to germicides. Aerobacter aerogenes, typhi, hempohilus influenza, Escherichia coli, proteus vulgaris, pseudomonas aeruginosa, salmonella schottmulleri and vibria comma are examples.
  • Gram-Positive Bacteria - Bacillus anthracis, clostridium butyricum, clostridium tetani, clostridium welchii, corynebacterium diphtheriae, diplococcus pneumoniae, mycobacterium tuberculosis, staphylococcus aureus, and streptococcus hemolyticus are examples. Gram-positive bacteria will retain the gram-stain and become colored.
  • H1N1 flu is also known as swine flu.
  • Hospital Grade Disinfectant - Recommended for use in hospitals, medical related facilities including veterinary facilities. Must be effective against Salmonella, staphylococcus, and Pseudomonas.
  • Microbicide - An agent that kills microbes.
  • Mildew can be described as a specific type of mold. It can develop indoors, and the appearance and texture of this substance is much different than that of mold. It develops as a flat pattern that looks powdery or fluffy. It most typically is white, gray, or yellow and will be found along a moist surface. Over time, mildew will darken in color, turning brown or black. Exposure to mildew can cause health issues just as mold can, although not as severe. When it’s inhaled, mildew spores lead to headaches, a sore throat, coughing and other respiratory issues.
  • Mold - The CDC estimates that there are over 10,000 species of mold that can live inside your home. Mold looks different than mildew - it usually appears to be “fuzzy,” as well as slimy. It shows itself in irregular shapes and the colors of these spots are rarely consistent, ranging in shades of blue, green, yellow, brown, gray, black, or white. Mold has a “musty” smell, which is a tell-tale sign of its existence in a space. Mold grows in the form of black or green patches which penetrate beneath the surface of the affected material.
  • MRSA is an acronym for Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus. It is an antibiotic resistant Superbug bacteria that grows in clusters, multiplies very rapidly and can cause many different kinds of infection, ranging from simple skin infections (boils, furuncles) to septicemia (infection of the bloodstream) and toxic shock syndrome. MRSA is resistant to antibiotics such as penicillin and amoxicillin. The difference between it and common staph infections is that MRSA is antibiotic-resistant and can become deadly. MRSA is popularly termed in the press as a “superbug”.
  • Norovirus is a very contagious virus that causes vomiting and diarrhea and is often implicated on cruise ship outbreaks. The highly contagious norovirus can tear through cruise ships, classrooms, and other crowded spaces, leaving vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach cramps in its wake. The CDC estimates that noroviruses are responsible for more than half of all food-borne disease outbreaks each year.
  • Phenolics have long been used for their antiseptic, disinfectant, or preservative properties. Phenolic compounds act to denature and coagulate proteins. Phenol (carbolic acid) is one of the oldest antiseptic agents. Hexachlorophene is a phenolic that was once used as a germicidal additive to some household products but was banned due to suspected harmful effects.
  • Quaternaries (quats) are a class of surface-active agents of the quaternary ammonium type and are good cleaning agents. They exhibit bactericidal as well as detergent properties. But, high water hardness and materials such as cotton rags and mops can make them less microbicidal because cotton absorbs the active ingredients. Therefore, it is best to use synthetic mops for cleaning hard floors. Quats will void stain-resistant nylon carpet warranties.
  • Sanitization refers to killing 99+ % of germs in applicable situations.
  • Sanitizer - An agent limited in scope but more effective than a bacteriostat; a sanitizing agent will reduce the majority of germ and bacteria forms to a safe level. It is safe where it is not necessary to totally destroy all bacteria. The main difference between a sanitizer and a disinfectant is that at a specified use dilution, the disinfectant must have a higher kill capability for pathogenic bacteria compared to that of a sanitizer.
  • Sporicidal - Denotes the ability of a chemical substance to destroy spores such as mold.
  • Sporicide - An agent that kills bacterial spores.
  • Sterilants, such as glutaraldehyde or formaldehyde, are capable of eliminating all forms of microbial life, including spores.
  • Sterilization is the killing of all microorganisms in a material or on the surface of an object.
  • Sterile - Free of all viable organisms.
  • Sterilize - To free from all living micro-organisms including germs, bacterial spores, etc.
  • Superbugs are strains of bacteria, such as MRSA, that are resistant to most antibiotics and can cause pneumonia, urinary tract infections and skin infections.
  • Swine flu is the name for the influenza type A virus that affects pigs (swine). Although swine flu doesn’t typically affect humans, there was a global outbreak (pandemic) in 2009–2010, the first flu pandemic in more than 40 years. H1N1 flu is also known as swine flu.
  • Viricide or Virucide - An agent that inactivates viruses.
  • Virus - A parasitic micro-organism existing within a cell. Most viruses can pass through a filter that retains bacteria.

NOTE: Many states require that a contractor applying a disinfectant or any other EPA-registered product be licensed. Please contact your state EPA office for further information.

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Copyright: Bane-Clene® Corp.

Date Modified: December 4, 2019

Date Published: December 4, 2019



Wednesday, November 27, 2019

Thanksgiving Day

ThanksgivingThanksgiving is truly a special day. It was first celebrated in 1621 when the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag Native Americans shared a fall harvest. In 1863, President Lincoln proclaimed a national day of thanksgiving to be celebrated each year on the fourth Thursday of November.

Thanksgiving Day is more than memories, food, football and parades. It is a day of thanks. On this day, we are reminded of the bounty of treasures that are a part of our everyday lives.

We spend a few, often too brief, moments in prayer or meditation before dinner to say thanks for our family, friends and the wonderfulness of our lives. The true meaning of Thanksgiving should not end there. Ponder the two words that are involved: thanks and giving. We should therefore be reminded to give thanks and to share. Take the time to share our economic benefits, material wealth and talents with those who can use our help.

Once again as you sit down to dinner, ponder the true meaning of Thanksgiving.

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Friday, November 22, 2019

OPTIMIST

Successful owner/operators are always optimists. They expect things to go well. They represent their companies with the utmost confidence. They don’t worry about competitors. They believe their companies are the best. They know being an optimist has a positive effect on their customers and their employees.

However, sometimes things don’t go as planned. A job may not go as well as they thought and the customer is unhappy. Or a competitor gets a job they had bid on. Some people might be deflated and their confidence and optimism may suffer.

When faced with a negative situation, don’t get down. Look at the situation as an opportunity. If the customer was unhappy with the job, immediately work to correct the problem. If you lose a bid to a competitor, reexamine your presentation to make sure you covered all the features and benefits of your company and the equipment and chemicals that you use.

Once again, always expect the best but if you have a problem treat it as an opportunity and always remain an optimist.

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Wednesday, November 20, 2019

White Residue from Ice Melt



White Tracks at Building Entrance?

Snow and ice melt in the winter



Cold weather, snow and ice brings out ice melt compounds for use on streets, sidewalks and parking lots.

Usually, the ice melt used is sodium chloride salt, but in below zero weather, calcium chloride is frequently used. Calcium chloride is exothermic (releases heat when it dissolves) and is effective even at -40° Fahrenheit

On waxed VCT floors, rock salt (sodium chloride) leaves a white powdery residue that can dull and eat away the floor finish or wax and potentially damage the floor as well. Worse yet, the oily residue from calcium chloride ice melt can be slippery on smooth floors creating a slip hazard, fall injuries and potential lawsuits.

On wood floors, ice melt leaves behind an slippery, oily residue that can damage urethane or wax finishes used on wood floors and may eventually draw out natural moisture, causing splintering.

On rugs, ice melt can lead to dry rot issues.

On carpets, calcium chloride and magnesium chloride ice melt attracts dirt on carpets and is hard to remove by normal cleaning.

When tracked into a building, the residue of calcium chloride absorbs and holds moisture, keeping carpet, walk-off mats and hard surface floors wet and slippery. When calcium chloride comes in contact with a normal detergent solution, such as that used in extraction cleaning or mopping, alkalinity in the detergent converts the calcium chloride into calcium hydroxide (lime), which is almost completely insoluble in water. As a result, the carpet or hard surface floor takes on a white, dull appearance, which can be difficult to remove.

Quick removal is important!


Follow these Steps to Remove Ice Melt Residue from Carpet and Keep Ice Melt From Harming Floors and Carpet:

  • Remove all mats.
  • On carpets and rugs:
    • If dry, thoroughly vacuum first.
    • Apply Brown Out® ice melt residue remover at normal concentration. If the white tracking problem is severe, apply Brown Out undiluted.
    • Brown Out is on the acid side, dissolves calcium chloride without turning it to lime.
    • Extract the carpet or rug with Brown Out.
    • For large carpeted areas, extract with at least 4-8 ounces per gallon solution of Brown Out in water (with no detergent) through the base unit or a portable extractor.
    • At this point, you can do normal extraction cleaning.
  • On hard floors:
    • Thoroughly sweep and vacuum the area.
    • Mop the same areas with a microfiber flat mop to remove any remaining dry ice melt crystals.
    • Damp mop with a Brown Out at normal concentration.
    • Rinse the floor with clean water if needed.
    • Repeat the process if ice melt remains.
  • WARNING: DO not use Brown Out, or any other acid, on marble or limestone or on polished concrete floors!

How to Prevent Ice Melt Problems in a Business Building:

  • In a commercial building, use at least 15 feet of walk off matting that includes a combination of wipe and scraper matting.
  • Use Brown Out daily to help prevention of ice melt deposits on hard floors.
  • In entry areas where ice melt tracking is likely to occur, mop floors regularly Brown Out as above.
  • Keep areas outside just before entering a building as clean and ice free as possible.

How to Prevent Ice Melt Problems in a House:

  • Minimize the amount of ice melt tracked into the house by using doormats and rugs on the inside and outside of all of the home’s entrances.
  • Clean the doormats as often as possible with a mop or vacuum throughout the day.

 
Calcium chloride ice melt in the winter







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Copyright: Bane-Clene® Corp.

Date Modified: November 20, 2019

Adapted from an article in the Winter 2006 Cleaning Digest, page 10, published: November 1, 2006



Friday, November 15, 2019

Do Something To Relax

Work, home life, even life in general can at times be stressful. Outside pursuits and activities can help us to relax, decompress and recharge our batteries. They do not need to be elaborate; in fact, the simpler the better. Here are some ideas.

Work in your yard. Not only will it relieve stress, there is the added benefit that it will beautify your home.

Try a new restaurant. A good meal is a way to relax.

Reach out to a family member, relative or friend. Ask them how they are doing and let them know how you are doing.

Take a walk. Enjoy the scenery, soak up the sunshine and fresh air.

Read something. Reading stimulates the mind and allows you to focus on something else.

Watch some TV. Especially consider a comedy, laughing is good for the soul.

There are many other simple and creative activities which don't take much time.

The important thing is to Do Something To Relax.

Related Carpet Cleaning Business Articles and Information:

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The Bane-Clene® Team.



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Wednesday, November 13, 2019

Winter’s Coming for Some Cleaners and Already Here for Others! Get Your Carpet Cleaning Business Ready!



Winter’s Upon Us - Be Prepared to Succeed in Carpet Cleaning Even When It’s Cold!

Winter Carpet Cleaning Procedures



Cleaning Carpets in the Winter - Some Guidelines and Advice:

Like you, I usually hate to think about winter and start wishing for the hot days that I had been complaining about.

When setting up for a job, take solution hoses into the house first. Lay them down in the entryway and set up your extension cord. Start the pump running right away. After getting all set up and moving the furniture, plug in your solution hose and start cleaning.This procedure will help keep your hoses from freezing.

Make sure cleaning heads and hoses are drained when finished cleaning. Freezing will damage the tee-jets and other brass fittings. If you do not have a heated garage, use a space heater in your van. Plug in your equipment’s electric water heater to keep clean water hot. This will help keep the inside of the van warm, too.

Be sure to do all the necessary and routine maintenance on your equipment. Have spare pump screws and a stator handy. Carry a shovel to clean side walks and areas around the van. Don’t forget to use door drapes to keep the heat inside the house and the cold out. Be sure to wear shoe booties inside the house or building - don’t bring snow, salt and grime into the home!

Spray a silicone lubricant on the outer edge of truck doors that are frozen shut. Wait a few minutes until the silicone sinks in then try to open the door gently. Don’t yank on it or you may damage the weather stripping.

If the emergency or parking brake won’t release, rock the truck back and forth gently by putting it in forward and then reverse while trying to release the brake. If this doesn’t work, have it towed somewhere warm so the cables underneath can thaw.

Ice buildup around windshield wipers will damage the blades and may cause the wiper motors to burn out.

A frozen cooling fan can cause the engine to overheat. Watch the temperature gauge. If it starts to climb into the red, stop. Turn off the truck and wait a few minutes, then try starting it again.

Most of the calls we get in the winter about frozen pumps, busted stators, etc. in the winter are from warm states like Florida. Most of our customers in “frigid North” know the necessity of being prepared!








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Copyright: Bane-Clene® Corp.

Date Modified: October 22, 2019

Date Published: October 22, 2019



Friday, November 08, 2019

NO ONE SAID IT WOULD BE EASY

All of us who work for a living, work hard. Certainly, there are jobs that look glamorous, pay a lot and seem to have a tremendous amount of perks. But even the people who have those jobs have to work hard.

All jobs have their degree of competitiveness. Everyone has to keep honing their skills, learning new ways to do the job better and in general get better at what they do.

No One Said It Would Be Easy! You need to take control of your attitude and have the feeling and knowledge that you control your destiny. It takes courage and energy to always work hard and never quit.

If you do all that, then hopefully you will be able to say “That was Easy”.

Related Carpet Cleaning Business Articles and Information:

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Wednesday, November 06, 2019

How do the Carpet Manufacturers Dye Carpet and How does it Affect Carpet Cleaning?


How Carpet is Dyed by the Mill or Fiber Producer

Solution Dyed Carpet Fibers



Carpet is dyed at one of two stages in the manufacturing process:

  1. PRE-DYED: Dyestuffs are added to the fibers or yarn PRIOR TO the tufting process.
  2. POST-DYED: The yarn was undyed when tufted and then the unfinished carpet is dyed.

There are four primary PRE-DYED Carpet Dyeing methods:

  1. SOLUTION DYEING:

    In solution dyeing of carpet, dyestuffs are added to the molten polymer before extrusion into a colored filament. As a result, the filament is impregnated with the color pigment all the way through.

    The only way to dye olefin is by solution dyeing.

    Commercial nylon is also quite often solution-dyed. However, unless appropriate acid dye blockers are applied after carpet manufacturing, solution-dyed nylon can continue to accept acid dyes from food spills, coffee, colas, etc.

    There are several advantages to solution dyeing fibers:
    • When a fiber is dyed post-production (as in traditional dye methods), the dye soaks into the fiber and fills the fiber’s cells. After being dyed, the fiber appears uniformly colored, at least to the naked eye. However, there are always cells in the fiber that did not absorb the dye - these are known as empty dye sites.
    • To understand the difference this makes, picture a radish and a carrot. The radish represents the traditional-dyed fiber, where the color is on the exterior but does not go through. (The radish is red on the outside but white on the inside.) By contrast, the carrot is orange all the way through, in the same way that a solution-dyed fiber has color throughout. As a result, solution dyed fiber is much more resistant to staining.
    • Solution-dyed fibers are much more colorfast (resistant to fading or color bleeding) than other fibers. This is because the color is locked into the fibers. So, solution-dyed fiber is a great choice for areas that will be subjected to intense light.
    • Also, because the fibers are stabilized during production using ultraviolet inhibitors, they are the best choice for use in outdoor carpet applications.
    • Solution-dyed fibers are great for use in commercial carpets.
    • The primary disadvantage of solution-dyed fibers is the reduced color selection, compared to other fibers.
  2. STOCK DYEING: The yarn was undyed when tufted and then the unfinished carpet is dyed.


  3. SKEIN DYEING: (pronounced “skane”). Dyeing yarn in skein form is used for small lots. Yarn is unwound from cones to skeins and then are mounted and immersed into a large hot dye vat. After dyeing and drying the yarn is rewound onto cones.


  4. SPACE DYEING: Several colors are printed along the yarn length to produce a tweed effect when tufted.


Most residential carpets are POST-DYED:

  • BECK DYEING is primarily for solid colors in limited runs. In this method, the carpet is dyed “in a piece” after tufting but before other finishing processes such as attaching the secondary backing. Large rolls in rope form of uncolored carpet (greige goods - pronounced “gray goods”) are placed in a large vat of dye solution (dye beck), heated to high temperatures, agitated continually while it is soaking up the dye, making the color come out very even from end to end and side to side. It is then removed, washed and dried. This is most commonly used for cut pile carpet. Beck dyeing a roll of carpet usually takes between three to six hours, depending on the color and the amount of carpet to be dyed.
    • NOTE: Greige goods is a term designating carpet just off the tufting machine and in an undyed or unfinished state.
  • In CONTINUOUS DYEING, the carpet (greige goods) is rinsed and then passed under a dye applicator, which spreads or sprays dyes evenly across the entire width of the carpet. The carpet then enters a steam chamber, where the dyes are “set” into the fibers. This method is for longer runs of both solid and multi-color applications.
  • PRINT DYEING is the process of producing a pattern with dyestuffs on carpets and rugs, done with screen-printing, roller equipment or ink jet printers. This is easily checked for in the field by bending over the fiber tuft - if the tuft is only dyed part of the way down, it is print dyed. After print dyeing, the carpet is steamed and dried. Do not use high-pH aggressive detergents on print dyed carpet. This type of dyeing allows tone on tone and multi-color effects. Included in this method are flat bed printing, rotary printing, silkscreen printing and computerized jet spray printing.
  • DIFFERENTIAL DYEING: Tufted carpet with yarn treated chemically so that when placed in a dye bath each yarn type will react differently to the dye, resulting in different shades of the same color.

Related Carpet Manufacturing Training Products:

  • Carpet Fibers and Manufacture 2-hour DVD by Bane-Clene’s Chemist

Related Carpet Mill Manufacture Information and Articles:


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Copyright: Bane-Clene® Corp.

Date Published: November 10, 2014

Date Modified: September 18, 2019

Friday, November 01, 2019

WHAT NOT TO DO

All business people strive to be successful. There are many things you can do to achieve success, but here are some ideas on What Not To Do if you want to achieve success.

Don’t try to do it alone. All of us need the support of family, friends and business associates to help us reach our goals.

Don’t wait for the right time. If you wait too long or until there are no perceived obstacles you may never get started.

Don’t always think it will be fun. Achieving your goals and dreams is hard work. Work may not always be pleasurable but don’t let hard work deter you.

Don’t let fear control you. All of us go through periods of self doubt. Being able to overcome those doubts and fears is a true sign of success.

Don’t doubt the progress you have made. If you compare yourself to others doing the same thing you may be disappointed. Others may achieve success faster than you but that doesn’t make them more successful than you.

Don’t see a perceived failure as a failure. It may actually be a step in helping you achieve your goal by trying a different way to do something.

Don’t forget we all have a gift to give. Pursuing your dreams and achieving success is your contribution to society.

Related Carpet Cleaning Business Articles and Information:

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The Bane-Clene® Team.



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Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Wicking of Soil and Dirt after Cleaning Carpet Causing Recurring Spots and Stains



Wicking of Soil after Cleaning Carpet

Illustration of wicking of soil as carpet dries.



What is wicking? Wicking after cleaning carpet is the upward capillary motion of water and cleaning solution during drying from the base of a tuft to its tip. The problem is that this carries with it any remaining soil and detergent in the carpet backing, carpet padding and even the subflooring, all of which is then deposited on the tips of the tuft and dries.

What Causes Soil Wicking on Cleaned Carpet?

  • The biggest cause of soil wicking is over-wetting due to a poorly trained technician with a ‘who cares’ attitude in a big hurry to collect the money and move on to the next job.
  • Over-wetting, especially by using the ‘double stroke’ cleaning technique.
  • Slow drying due to poor cleaning technique or poor extraction.
  • Overuse of pre-spray and failure to extract out all of the traffic lane spotter solution.
  • Heavy accumulation of soil at the base of carpet tufts.
  • Residue from soil and spills that wasn’t completely removed by the cleaner.
  • High humidity in the cleaned room causing slow evaporation.
    • An example would be an apartment or retail store where immediately after the carpet is cleaned, the air circulation and air conditioner is turned off.
  • Heavy spills or pet urine in the carpet backing and pad.
  • Wicking on olefin carpets and rugs is especially severe because the cleaning solution quickly sinks to the backing before it is extracted out.
  • A spill or soil has penetrated deep into the carpet, the carpet backing and even into the carpet pad or cushion, requiring extra cleaning and spotting.

How to Prevent Soil Wicking on Cleaned Carpet?

  • Since wicking can only occur while the carpet is still wet, anything you can do to leave the carpet as dry as possible and shorten the drying time will greatly reduce wicking and reapparing spots:
    • If a lot of cleaning strokes had to be used on an especially dirty carpet, set up air movers after cleaning to speed up drying.
    • Wicking on loop pile carpet can be greatly reduced by following hot water extraction with dry bonnet cleaning. This is especially helpful on commercial olefin loop carpet with a large number of spills. NOTE: Do not run a DRY bonnet on olefin (polypropylene) carpet or rug - olefin has a very low softening point!
    • Take extra dry strokes with the floor tool while cleaning.
  • Use a Water Claw® Sub-Surface Carpet Spot Lifter on heavy spills.
  • Use only enough cleaning solution to do the job.
  • Do not use any more prespray than necessary.
  • Do not use a higher pH detergent than necessary.
  • Do not use a higher detergent concentration than needed - The phrase “If a little bit does a good job, more will do better” couldn’t be more false when it comes to cleaning.
  • If wicking of residue from spotting or a spill is anticipated, the last step after spot removal should be to leave a weighted dry towel on the cleaned spot or use Stain Blotter.
  • Apply a fluorochemical carpet protector, such as Bane-Guard™, Teflon® or Sta-Clene® Soil & Stain Repellent.
  • Immediately following cleaning, apply ARA Anti-Wicking Agent where wicking and resoiling may be a problem.
  • Extraction clean with an encapsulating detergent such as SCR Soil Crystallization Rinse.

How to Correct Reoccurring Spots and Stains Caused by Wicking?

  • Applying an absorbent powder like Stain Blotter to absorb the soil and solution wicking to the surface from a spill.
  • Applying an encapsulating product like Pro's Choice ARA Anti-Resoiling Agent after cleaning.
  • Following cleaning, doing a Brown Out flush, also called an “acid rinse” after cleaning.

How to Use Stain Blotter to Remove and Prevent Reoccurring Spots and Stains:

  1. Rinse spot thoroughly.
  2. Leave the spot as dry as possible by making several vacuum only passes with floor tool or upholstery tool following rinse.
  3. Allow spot to dry COMPLETELY.
  4. Cover the spot with Stain Blotter by sprinkling it onto the carpet until the fibers are covered by a 1/4 inch blanket of powder.
  5. Allow spot to dry COMPLETELY.
  6. Vacuum thoroughly to remove Stain Blotter along with the soil it has absorbed.

How to Use Stain Blotter On Spills:

  1. Pour Stain Blotter liberally onto the spill.
  2. Agitate gently to absorb spill into powder.
  3. Cover an additional 2 inches of carpet around the spot.
  4. Vacuum or sweep up to remove contaminated powder.
  5. Re-apply Stain Blotter to cover spill.
  6. Allow to dry thoroughly.
  7. Vacuum thoroughly to remove Stain Blotter powder along with soil it has absorbed.

How to Use Pro's Choice ARA Anti-Resoiling Agent to Prevent Wicking and Resoiling:

  1. Keep out of reach of children.
  2. Read label directions and cautions before using.
  3. Warm water extract the carpet and get the carpet as dry as possible.
  4. Spray an even coat of ARA onto the carpet in areas where rapid resoiling is likely to occur or has occurred in the past at the rate of 3 ounces ARA per square yard.
  5. After the carpet is completely dry, vacuum the treated areas very thoroughly with an upright vacuum cleaner equipped with a brush.

The pictures below from Pro’s Choice illustrate the effectiveness of ARA preventing reappearing spots, in this case reappearing coffee spill:

Reappearing Soil, 1 week after cleaning.
Carpet following cleaning of area.
ARA Anti-Resoiling Agent Applied to 1/2 of the Problem Area.
Reappearance of soil within 2 weeks.
Before and after treatment  with ARA.

Brown Out Flush Procedure to Reduce Wicking and Browning:

  • Use Brown Out® to reduce wicking and re-soiling on carpet that has been improperly cleaned and is loaded with detergent residue or the consumer has left a lot of spotter residue.
  • In this procedure, DO NOT pre-spray the carpet or use any extraction emulsifier or detergent.
  • Using Brown Out, extraction clean using plenty of vacuum-only strokes to leave carpet as dry as possible.
  • Some technicians call this an “acid rinse”. A better term is “Brown Out flush” since the word acid sounds dangerous to a consumer!

Effects of Wicking of Carpet after Extraction Cleaning:

Additional Information on Preventing Wicking and Reappearing Spots and Resoiling of Carpet:

Products to Prevent Wicking and Reappearing Spots and Stains on Carpet:








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Copyright: Bane-Clene® Corp.

Date Modified: October 6, 2019

Date Originally Published: November 10, 2014