Friday, November 08, 2019

NO ONE SAID IT WOULD BE EASY

All of us who work for a living, work hard. Certainly, there are jobs that look glamorous, pay a lot and seem to have a tremendous amount of perks. But even the people who have those jobs have to work hard.

All jobs have their degree of competitiveness. Everyone has to keep honing their skills, learning new ways to do the job better and in general get better at what they do.

No One Said It Would Be Easy! You need to take control of your attitude and have the feeling and knowledge that you control your destiny. It takes courage and energy to always work hard and never quit.

If you do all that, then hopefully you will be able to say “That was Easy”.

Related Carpet Cleaning Business Articles and Information:

Thank you for reading Bane’s Blog®

Please read the latest issue of the Clene-Times® at www.baneclene.com/publications/.

Please visit our web site at www.baneclene.com.

The Bane-Clene® Team.



Free Bane-Clene Information Package

Bane-Clene Paper CatalogFree packet of information about Bane-Clene can be obtained by calling toll-free 1-800-428-9512 (U.S. ONLY!). Your information packet will include a full color catalog and price addendum. Packets will arrive in approximately 2 weeks through standard United States Mail.

You can also order the packet at the Catalog Request Form.





“A
to Z” Alphabetical Index to the Bane-Clene Web Site




Print this page


Wednesday, November 06, 2019

How do the Carpet Manufacturers Dye Carpet and How does it Affect Carpet Cleaning?


How Carpet is Dyed by the Mill or Fiber Producer

Solution Dyed Carpet Fibers



Carpet is dyed at one of two stages in the manufacturing process:

  1. PRE-DYED: Dyestuffs are added to the fibers or yarn PRIOR TO the tufting process.
  2. POST-DYED: The yarn was undyed when tufted and then the unfinished carpet is dyed.

There are four primary PRE-DYED Carpet Dyeing methods:

  1. SOLUTION DYEING:

    In solution dyeing of carpet, dyestuffs are added to the molten polymer before extrusion into a colored filament. As a result, the filament is impregnated with the color pigment all the way through.

    The only way to dye olefin is by solution dyeing.

    Commercial nylon is also quite often solution-dyed. However, unless appropriate acid dye blockers are applied after carpet manufacturing, solution-dyed nylon can continue to accept acid dyes from food spills, coffee, colas, etc.

    There are several advantages to solution dyeing fibers:
    • When a fiber is dyed post-production (as in traditional dye methods), the dye soaks into the fiber and fills the fiber’s cells. After being dyed, the fiber appears uniformly colored, at least to the naked eye. However, there are always cells in the fiber that did not absorb the dye - these are known as empty dye sites.
    • To understand the difference this makes, picture a radish and a carrot. The radish represents the traditional-dyed fiber, where the color is on the exterior but does not go through. (The radish is red on the outside but white on the inside.) By contrast, the carrot is orange all the way through, in the same way that a solution-dyed fiber has color throughout. As a result, solution dyed fiber is much more resistant to staining.
    • Solution-dyed fibers are much more colorfast (resistant to fading or color bleeding) than other fibers. This is because the color is locked into the fibers. So, solution-dyed fiber is a great choice for areas that will be subjected to intense light.
    • Also, because the fibers are stabilized during production using ultraviolet inhibitors, they are the best choice for use in outdoor carpet applications.
    • Solution-dyed fibers are great for use in commercial carpets.
    • The primary disadvantage of solution-dyed fibers is the reduced color selection, compared to other fibers.
  2. STOCK DYEING: The yarn was undyed when tufted and then the unfinished carpet is dyed.


  3. SKEIN DYEING: (pronounced “skane”). Dyeing yarn in skein form is used for small lots. Yarn is unwound from cones to skeins and then are mounted and immersed into a large hot dye vat. After dyeing and drying the yarn is rewound onto cones.


  4. SPACE DYEING: Several colors are printed along the yarn length to produce a tweed effect when tufted.


Most residential carpets are POST-DYED:

  • BECK DYEING is primarily for solid colors in limited runs. In this method, the carpet is dyed “in a piece” after tufting but before other finishing processes such as attaching the secondary backing. Large rolls in rope form of uncolored carpet (greige goods - pronounced “gray goods”) are placed in a large vat of dye solution (dye beck), heated to high temperatures, agitated continually while it is soaking up the dye, making the color come out very even from end to end and side to side. It is then removed, washed and dried. This is most commonly used for cut pile carpet. Beck dyeing a roll of carpet usually takes between three to six hours, depending on the color and the amount of carpet to be dyed.
    • NOTE: Greige goods is a term designating carpet just off the tufting machine and in an undyed or unfinished state.
  • In CONTINUOUS DYEING, the carpet (greige goods) is rinsed and then passed under a dye applicator, which spreads or sprays dyes evenly across the entire width of the carpet. The carpet then enters a steam chamber, where the dyes are “set” into the fibers. This method is for longer runs of both solid and multi-color applications.
  • PRINT DYEING is the process of producing a pattern with dyestuffs on carpets and rugs, done with screen-printing, roller equipment or ink jet printers. This is easily checked for in the field by bending over the fiber tuft - if the tuft is only dyed part of the way down, it is print dyed. After print dyeing, the carpet is steamed and dried. Do not use high-pH aggressive detergents on print dyed carpet. This type of dyeing allows tone on tone and multi-color effects. Included in this method are flat bed printing, rotary printing, silkscreen printing and computerized jet spray printing.
  • DIFFERENTIAL DYEING: Tufted carpet with yarn treated chemically so that when placed in a dye bath each yarn type will react differently to the dye, resulting in different shades of the same color.

Related Carpet Manufacturing Training Products:

  • Carpet Fibers and Manufacture 2-hour DVD by Bane-Clene’s Chemist

Related Carpet Mill Manufacture Information and Articles:


Free Bane-Clene Information Package

Bane-Clene Paper CatalogFree packet of information about Bane-Clene can be obtained by calling toll-free 1-800-428-9512 (U.S. ONLY!). Your information packet will include a full color catalog and price addendum. Packets will arrive in approximately 2 weeks through standard United States Mail.

You can also order the packet at the Catalog Request Form.


“A to Z” Alphabetical Index to the Bane-Clene Web Site


Print this page


Bane-Clene Logo

Copyright: Bane-Clene® Corp.

Date Published: November 10, 2014

Date Modified: September 18, 2019

Friday, November 01, 2019

WHAT NOT TO DO

All business people strive to be successful. There are many things you can do to achieve success, but here are some ideas on What Not To Do if you want to achieve success.

Don’t try to do it alone. All of us need the support of family, friends and business associates to help us reach our goals.

Don’t wait for the right time. If you wait too long or until there are no perceived obstacles you may never get started.

Don’t always think it will be fun. Achieving your goals and dreams is hard work. Work may not always be pleasurable but don’t let hard work deter you.

Don’t let fear control you. All of us go through periods of self doubt. Being able to overcome those doubts and fears is a true sign of success.

Don’t doubt the progress you have made. If you compare yourself to others doing the same thing you may be disappointed. Others may achieve success faster than you but that doesn’t make them more successful than you.

Don’t see a perceived failure as a failure. It may actually be a step in helping you achieve your goal by trying a different way to do something.

Don’t forget we all have a gift to give. Pursuing your dreams and achieving success is your contribution to society.

Related Carpet Cleaning Business Articles and Information:

Thank you for reading Bane’s Blog®

Please read the latest issue of the Clene-Times® at www.baneclene.com/publications/.

Please visit our web site at www.baneclene.com.

The Bane-Clene® Team.



Free Bane-Clene Information Package

Bane-Clene Paper CatalogFree packet of information about Bane-Clene can be obtained by calling toll-free 1-800-428-9512 (U.S. ONLY!). Your information packet will include a full color catalog and price addendum. Packets will arrive in approximately 2 weeks through standard United States Mail.

You can also order the packet at the Catalog Request Form.





“A
to Z” Alphabetical Index to the Bane-Clene Web Site




Print this page


Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Wicking of Soil and Dirt after Cleaning Carpet Causing Recurring Spots and Stains



Wicking of Soil after Cleaning Carpet

Illustration of wicking of soil as carpet dries.



What is wicking? Wicking after cleaning carpet is the upward capillary motion of water and cleaning solution during drying from the base of a tuft to its tip. The problem is that this carries with it any remaining soil and detergent in the carpet backing, carpet padding and even the subflooring, all of which is then deposited on the tips of the tuft and dries.

What Causes Soil Wicking on Cleaned Carpet?

  • The biggest cause of soil wicking is over-wetting due to a poorly trained technician with a ‘who cares’ attitude in a big hurry to collect the money and move on to the next job.
  • Over-wetting, especially by using the ‘double stroke’ cleaning technique.
  • Slow drying due to poor cleaning technique or poor extraction.
  • Overuse of pre-spray and failure to extract out all of the traffic lane spotter solution.
  • Heavy accumulation of soil at the base of carpet tufts.
  • Residue from soil and spills that wasn’t completely removed by the cleaner.
  • High humidity in the cleaned room causing slow evaporation.
    • An example would be an apartment or retail store where immediately after the carpet is cleaned, the air circulation and air conditioner is turned off.
  • Heavy spills or pet urine in the carpet backing and pad.
  • Wicking on olefin carpets and rugs is especially severe because the cleaning solution quickly sinks to the backing before it is extracted out.
  • A spill or soil has penetrated deep into the carpet, the carpet backing and even into the carpet pad or cushion, requiring extra cleaning and spotting.

How to Prevent Soil Wicking on Cleaned Carpet?

  • Since wicking can only occur while the carpet is still wet, anything you can do to leave the carpet as dry as possible and shorten the drying time will greatly reduce wicking and reapparing spots:
    • If a lot of cleaning strokes had to be used on an especially dirty carpet, set up air movers after cleaning to speed up drying.
    • Wicking on loop pile carpet can be greatly reduced by following hot water extraction with dry bonnet cleaning. This is especially helpful on commercial olefin loop carpet with a large number of spills. NOTE: Do not run a DRY bonnet on olefin (polypropylene) carpet or rug - olefin has a very low softening point!
    • Take extra dry strokes with the floor tool while cleaning.
  • Use a Water Claw® Sub-Surface Carpet Spot Lifter on heavy spills.
  • Use only enough cleaning solution to do the job.
  • Do not use any more prespray than necessary.
  • Do not use a higher pH detergent than necessary.
  • Do not use a higher detergent concentration than needed - The phrase “If a little bit does a good job, more will do better” couldn’t be more false when it comes to cleaning.
  • If wicking of residue from spotting or a spill is anticipated, the last step after spot removal should be to leave a weighted dry towel on the cleaned spot or use Stain Blotter.
  • Apply a fluorochemical carpet protector, such as Bane-Guard™, Teflon® or Sta-Clene® Soil & Stain Repellent.
  • Immediately following cleaning, apply ARA Anti-Wicking Agent where wicking and resoiling may be a problem.
  • Extraction clean with an encapsulating detergent such as SCR Soil Crystallization Rinse.

How to Correct Reoccurring Spots and Stains Caused by Wicking?

  • Applying an absorbent powder like Stain Blotter to absorb the soil and solution wicking to the surface from a spill.
  • Applying an encapsulating product like Pro's Choice ARA Anti-Resoiling Agent after cleaning.
  • Following cleaning, doing a Brown Out flush, also called an “acid rinse” after cleaning.

How to Use Stain Blotter to Remove and Prevent Reoccurring Spots and Stains:

  1. Rinse spot thoroughly.
  2. Leave the spot as dry as possible by making several vacuum only passes with floor tool or upholstery tool following rinse.
  3. Allow spot to dry COMPLETELY.
  4. Cover the spot with Stain Blotter by sprinkling it onto the carpet until the fibers are covered by a 1/4 inch blanket of powder.
  5. Allow spot to dry COMPLETELY.
  6. Vacuum thoroughly to remove Stain Blotter along with the soil it has absorbed.

How to Use Stain Blotter On Spills:

  1. Pour Stain Blotter liberally onto the spill.
  2. Agitate gently to absorb spill into powder.
  3. Cover an additional 2 inches of carpet around the spot.
  4. Vacuum or sweep up to remove contaminated powder.
  5. Re-apply Stain Blotter to cover spill.
  6. Allow to dry thoroughly.
  7. Vacuum thoroughly to remove Stain Blotter powder along with soil it has absorbed.

How to Use Pro's Choice ARA Anti-Resoiling Agent to Prevent Wicking and Resoiling:

  1. Keep out of reach of children.
  2. Read label directions and cautions before using.
  3. Warm water extract the carpet and get the carpet as dry as possible.
  4. Spray an even coat of ARA onto the carpet in areas where rapid resoiling is likely to occur or has occurred in the past at the rate of 3 ounces ARA per square yard.
  5. After the carpet is completely dry, vacuum the treated areas very thoroughly with an upright vacuum cleaner equipped with a brush.

The pictures below from Pro’s Choice illustrate the effectiveness of ARA preventing reappearing spots, in this case reappearing coffee spill:

Reappearing Soil, 1 week after cleaning.
Carpet following cleaning of area.
ARA Anti-Resoiling Agent Applied to 1/2 of the Problem Area.
Reappearance of soil within 2 weeks.
Before and after treatment  with ARA.

Brown Out Flush Procedure to Reduce Wicking and Browning:

  • Use Brown Out® to reduce wicking and re-soiling on carpet that has been improperly cleaned and is loaded with detergent residue or the consumer has left a lot of spotter residue.
  • In this procedure, DO NOT pre-spray the carpet or use any extraction emulsifier or detergent.
  • Using Brown Out, extraction clean using plenty of vacuum-only strokes to leave carpet as dry as possible.
  • Some technicians call this an “acid rinse”. A better term is “Brown Out flush” since the word acid sounds dangerous to a consumer!

Effects of Wicking of Carpet after Extraction Cleaning:

Additional Information on Preventing Wicking and Reappearing Spots and Resoiling of Carpet:

Products to Prevent Wicking and Reappearing Spots and Stains on Carpet:








Free Bane-Clene Information Package

Bane-Clene Paper CatalogFree packet of information about Bane-Clene can be obtained by calling toll-free 1-800-428-9512 (U.S. ONLY!). Your information packet will include a full color catalog and price addendum. Packets will arrive in approximately 2 weeks through standard United States Mail.

You can also order the packet at the Catalog Request Form.



“A to Z” Alphabetical Index to the Bane-Clene Web Site




Print this page



Bane-Clene Logo





Copyright: Bane-Clene® Corp.

Date Modified: October 6, 2019

Date Originally Published: November 10, 2014



Friday, October 25, 2019

ONE DAY AT A TIME

All of us from time to time worry too much about a task or tasks that we have to do. Are you worrying about tomorrow or next week or even further into the future? While you don’t want to dismiss the future, you cannot spend all your time worrying about it.

So what is the answer? Try living One Day At A Time and within that, focus on each hour in a day and decide what can be accomplished each hour. By concentrating on one day’s work and shutting out other thoughts, it is possible to get a day’s work done without experiencing mental fatigue and worries about the future.

Many obstacles that stall our momentum are worrying about the bigger picture as opposed to the task at hand.

We can therefore help alleviate mental stress and fatigue by doing the best we can with the time we are given and by living One Day At A Time.

Related Carpet Cleaning Business Articles and Information:

Thank you for reading Bane’s Blog®

Please read the latest issue of the Clene-Times® at www.baneclene.com/publications/.

Please visit our web site at www.baneclene.com.

The Bane-Clene® Team.



Free Bane-Clene Information Package

Bane-Clene Paper CatalogFree packet of information about Bane-Clene can be obtained by calling toll-free 1-800-428-9512 (U.S. ONLY!). Your information packet will include a full color catalog and price addendum. Packets will arrive in approximately 2 weeks through standard United States Mail.

You can also order the packet at the Catalog Request Form.





“A
to Z” Alphabetical Index to the Bane-Clene Web Site




Print this page


Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Carpet Matting, Carpet Crushing and Roll Crush


Carpet Matting, Carpet Crushing and Roll Crush Versus Wear

Chemistry of Carpet



One of the most frequent complaints and misunderstood conditions with carpet is matting and crushing.

Reprinted from the Bane-Clene® Cleaning Digest - by Mark Johnston*

One of the most frequent complaints and misunderstood conditions with carpet is matting and crushing. Matting and crushing has been improperly labeled for a wide spectrum of maladies; however, the most common misconception is that matting and crushing is a sign of excessive wear. Consumers tend to erroneously evaluate wear on carpet in the one dimensional concept that any change in the textural intensity or structural organization of the carpet’s surface is excessive wear. Trying to differentiate these two conditions for the consumer can be quite exhaustive for a dealer or mill claims analyst.

One needs to look no further than the typical manufacturer’s wear warranty to understand that textural discrimination of actual fiber wear is deemed as an abrasive loss of fiber (usually 10% or more), and that conditions such as tears, pulls, cuts, pilling, shedding and matting and crushing are specifically excluded. While the language used in manufacturer’s wear warranties may clarify our industry’s definition of wear, this usually does not satisfy the consumer’s complaint or change her perception of “wear” on her carpet.

When matting and crushing occurs, fibers become bent and compressed by fatigue. Each fiber type and carpet construction will show varying degrees of departure from the carpet’s normal profile. Strong departures, however, are generally experienced when an improper pad is specified, or when improper maintenance and soil accumulation is present. Consequently, these conditions often cause the carpet fibers to become compacted and entangled beyond any hope of restoration of appearance or recovery of pile thickness.

Consumers should understand those changes in a carpet’s appearance, including textural changes (uniformity of texture), take place from the start of use and continue to occur throughout the life cycle of the carpet. According to the Carpet and Rug Institute’s life cycle analysis, the typical residential carpet is replaced every 11 years. However, replacements are made due to styling trends or from a loss of appearance, and not from wear. The most noticeable change in appearance occurs between the use areas such as in front of a chair or sofa, in the hallway and in the pivotal areas, when compared to the nonuse areas. These changes include staining, soiling, loss of tuft definition (untwisting of the yarn, decrimping of the fibers), a decrease in spatial density, and a tendency toward randomness. Heterogeneous properties, such as those obtained by blended yarns, may be altered and tufted patterns or features may become varied. Some or all of these conditions will eventually occur with every textile floor covering. Actual fiber “wear” on the other hand is normal, and will in almost all cases never occur with today’s modern synthetic fibers. They simply suffer from a gradual loss of appearance due to the aforementioned conditions. Considering this, the more informed consuming public has begun to question the meaningfulness of wear warranties. In response, many manufacturers now provide consumers with a quantifiable measurement that pertains to appearance change in the scope of their performance assessment. Although this type of analysis is based on a “square profile,” it provides an excellent means for evaluating textural changes on a carpet comparison basis. Several years ago, one major yarn producer did a study on approximately 300 homes with the typical family of four. According to this study, the commonly used performance assessment floor traffic count used today equated to one year of residential hallway traffic and 2 1/2 years of open space traffic. However, since each end-use has its own unique conditions, the rating a carpet receives cannot be accurately equated into a certain number of years of use in all cases, nor can it always be used as a benchmark to determine appearance based on number of occupants. As an example, a retired couple could conceivably put more traffic on a carpet in a shorter period of time than a home with two working adults and two teenagers.

Although matting and crushing will eventually occur with all fiber types and carpet constructions, carpet appearance can be prolonged and matting and crushing can be slowed by installing carpet over firm cushions. Without the support of a firm cushion, the face fibers of the carpet must absorb the traffic shocks on their own. Matting and crushing can also be offset by adopting a routine soil management program, and by occasionally rearranging furniture to alter traffic lanes. Carpet construction is also critical. Low, tight gauge, densely constructed carpets will maintain their appearance over a longer period of time than a medium or low grade construction in the same end-use. If you know a carpet is going to get heavy or more frequent use, the right carpet must be specified for the demands anticipated.

In the floor care arena, there is no question that the heat and/or moisture provided by steam cleaning can significantly help restore crushed fibers. What consumers should understand is that even with today’s advancements in fiber technology, we cannot totally offset the compressible nature of textile surfaces and the effects that constant foot traffic plays on floor coverings. If this weren’t true then every carpet made from a physically bolstered yarn system would obtain a negligible or no change rating (5.0) when subjected to floor traffic testing. Even then, matting and crushing would eventually occur sometime after the floor traffic test count had been exceeded by the end-user. Considering this, one must accept that various degrees of matting and crushing will remain a normal characteristic of carpet with use. However, virtually every claim or these conditions can be postponed and the appearance of the carpet maintained for a longer period of time when the right carpet and components are selected for end-use.


Editor's note: NOTHING will satisfactorily correct crushing, roll marks and matting on olefin (polypropylene) or polyester carpet because olefin and polyester fibers have zero resilience! A Jiffy Steamer® is excellent for removing crush marks, roll marks and matting from nylon carpet.


What Is Carpet Roll Crush or Pole Crush and How to Cure?

Carpet Roll Crush marks appear as wide bands across the carpet width

Carpet Roll Crush from Improper Storage and Shipping of Carpet

If the carpet roll has sat too long in storage or had rolls stacked too high on it, the weight will compress the carpet face resulting in what is called Roll Crush. Roll crush or pole crush rarely occurs at the manufacturing level since rolls are stored one roll in height at the mill. As a result, roll crush is usually not considered a manufacturing defect. Consequently, carpet manufacturers will often blame everyone else and refuse to fix the problem.

But, some carpet retailers store rolls at heights of three or more rolls! Roll crush also may occur during shipping where rolls are loaded several rolls high.

Carpet Roll Crush marks appear as wide bands across the carpet width and are easily identified since they are not evenly spaced but are progressively spaced closer as the carpet roll gets closer to the center.

How to Fix Roll-Crush:

In Nylon Carpet, roll crush marks often come out over time with heat and humidity especially in the summer - if the carpet was properly power stretched in place rather than knee-kicked in. If stubborn, they can usually be forced out by steaming with a “Jiffy Steamer” or by having the carpet hot water extraction cleaned. Sometimes, a pile lifter will help.

Polypropylene (Olefin) Carpet is a different story. Since polypropylene fiber has zero resilience, once it is crushed, it will not come back up - not even with steam.

Related Information, Articles and Videos:








Free Bane-Clene Information Package

Bane-Clene Paper CatalogFree packet of information about Bane-Clene can be obtained by calling toll-free 1-800-428-9512 (U.S. ONLY!). Your information packet will include a full color catalog and price addendum. Packets will arrive in approximately 2 weeks through standard United States Mail.

You can also order the packet at the Catalog Request Form.




ABC - Sitemap“A to Z” Alphabetical Index to the Bane-Clene Web Site

Bane-Clene Home Page




Print this page



Bane-Clene Logo





Copyright: Bane-Clene® Corp.

Date Modified: October 23, 2019

Date Published: October 12, 1999



Friday, October 18, 2019

PURSUIT OF MONEY

Money is a conundrum.

If you don’t get it, you are considered a loser and a failure.

If you do get it and don’t share it, you are a miser and selfish.

If you don’t even try to get it, you lack ambition and drive.

If you get it and spend too much, you are a spendthrift.

If you still have it after a lifetime of work, you're a person who never got any fun out of life.

So, what is the answer? Work hard, save for a rainy day, enjoy life and share your good fortune with others.

Related Carpet Cleaning Business Articles and Information:

Thank you for reading Bane’s Blog®

Please read the latest issue of the Clene-Times® at www.baneclene.com/publications/.

Please visit our web site at www.baneclene.com.

The Bane-Clene® Team.



Free Bane-Clene Information Package

Bane-Clene Paper CatalogFree packet of information about Bane-Clene can be obtained by calling toll-free 1-800-428-9512 (U.S. ONLY!). Your information packet will include a full color catalog and price addendum. Packets will arrive in approximately 2 weeks through standard United States Mail.

You can also order the packet at the Catalog Request Form.




ABC - Sitemap“A to Z” Alphabetical Index to the Bane-Clene Web Site

Bane-Clene Home Page




Print this page


Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Successful Pro's Choice CTI Stain Removal and Odor Control Class Held by Bane-Clene®

A well-attended and informative class by CTI Pro's Choice was held at the Bane-Clene® Training Center on October 11, 2019!

The CTI Pro's Choice instructor, Brian Bond, taught the class, including a Power Point presentation and hands-on demonstrations of the Pro's Choice carpet spot and stain removers and also the pet odor control products. Ted Gurnowski of Service Associates II, who teaches our stone care and wood floor restoration training classes and also participates in our 3-day Management Training School, assisted Brian.

Brian split the spotting part of the class into 4 basic categories:

  1. Synthetic Food Dyes: Stains containing man-made dye such as Kool-Aid®, Cough Syrup and Betadine® (Iodine).
  2. Organic Stains: Stains from a natural source such as Wood Furniture, Mustard, Coffee, Tea and Pet Urine.
  3. Petroleum-Based Stains: Petroleum Derivative such as Colored Candle Wax, Gum, Grease, Tar, Ballpoint Ink, Permanent Marker, Asphalt and Glue.
  4. Protein-Based stains (Biological): Stains originating from body secretion such as Cooking Grease, Vomit and Blood.

Brian Taught and Demonstrated Pro's Choice Spot and Stain Removal Products:

The odor control portion of the class covered the basics of pet odor identification, mapping and treatment.

The Pro's Choice Odor Control Products Covered by Brian Included:

Brian and Ted and audience


Brian Bond speaking to the audience


Brian Bond at the podium


Brian demonstrating

At the end of the class, Don Bane held a drawing for two free Pro's Choice Spotting Kits which were won by R & D Carpet Cleaning of Indiana and Michindoh Conference Center of Michigan.

Don also extended a 10% discount on all non-equipment purchases. A free lunch was enjoyed by all.

Don Bane pulling winning ticket

Bane-Clene Professional Carpet and Rug Spotting Guide

How to Remove Pet Urine Odor from Carpets and Rugs



Free Bane-Clene Information Package

Bane-Clene Paper CatalogFree packet of information about Bane-Clene can be obtained by calling toll-free 1-800-428-9512 (U.S. ONLY!). Your information packet will include a full color catalog and price addendum. Packets will arrive in approximately 2 weeks through standard United States Mail.

You can also order the packet at the Catalog Request Form.




Links to the Bane-Clene Web Site for Professional Carpet Cleaners

Bane-Clene Home Page




Print this page


Friday, October 11, 2019

USE OF TIME

Logical advice for owner/operators who want to improve their use of time is to focus on what contributes most to its best use. The opposite, however, may be something to focus on more.

What does not contribute but also wastes time? Try listing all your “time wasters” for a week. After that, rank them in order, with the task that wastes the most time at the top of the list.

Now comes the hard part. Are these time wasters your fault? Are they something you don’t need to do or are they something someone else could do?

A successful owner/operator will be able to identify and differentiate between the two.

They will ask themselves “what would happen if I didn’t to do this”? “Would it make a difference in the operation of their Company”? Finally, they should think “what would happen if I delegated this”?

The answers to these and other questions will help them in their Use of Time.

Related Carpet Cleaning Business Articles and Information:

Thank you for reading Bane’s Blog®

Please read the latest issue of the Clene-Times® at www.baneclene.com/publications/.

Please visit our web site at www.baneclene.com.

The Bane-Clene® Team.



Free Bane-Clene Information Package

Bane-Clene Paper CatalogFree packet of information about Bane-Clene can be obtained by calling toll-free 1-800-428-9512 (U.S. ONLY!). Your information packet will include a full color catalog and price addendum. Packets will arrive in approximately 2 weeks through standard United States Mail.

You can also order the packet at the Catalog Request Form.




ABC - Sitemap“A to Z” Alphabetical Index to the Bane-Clene Web Site

Bane-Clene Home Page




Print this page