Friday, July 28, 2017

What Makes Your Company Reputable?

How many businesses would you considerable reputable today? Perhaps not many. Even the giants of industry can fall flat on their faces from time to time. When an article is published about a Company's failure in an area, their reputation immediately takes a hit. Even if at a later date the article is retracted or changed to show that in the end the Company was not at fault, it is too late. With the negative press they have received, their credibility has dropped, their reputation has become tarnished and in some cases the consumer has stopped buying their products or services.

Could this happen to the Carpet Cleaning Industry? Unfortunately, yes and we may be at fault, if we do not prepare for this. As an industry, we have the ammunition to combat the bait and switch artists, the low ball prices and others that use non-professional tactics trying to make a quick buck. That ammunition is education.

If you are educated on types of carpeting, types of cleaning processes and what different chemicals will do, you will have a leg up on your competition. This basic but yet highly important knowledge will assist in communicating with your customers and assure them they are dealing with a reputable company.

At the Bane-Clene® Institute, we cover these and other important topics. Also we have a wealth of information available on line in the "For Professionals" section at www.baneclene.com.

Most of the customers we service would never think of being a DIY; however, it is possible. Therefore, it must be considered as a potential hazard.

Related information on the Bane-Clene web site:

Thank you for reading Bane’s Blog®.

Please read the latest issue of the Clene-Times® at https://www.baneclene.com/publications/.

Please visit our new and improved web site at https://www.baneclene.com.

The Bane-Clene® Team.

Friday, July 21, 2017

Technician Alert Warning!

Carpet cleaning technicians must be constantly on the alert for potential liability situations.

Commercials on television for rental equipment show a cleaning head working around the legs or bases of furniture. The consumer who sees this and uses this equipment may do the same thing. You have no way of knowing if a DIY (do-it-yourself) operator has preceded you and left permanent stains beneath a piece of furniture.

In the event you move a piece of furniture and see furniture stains, do not proceed to clean the area until you have informed the owner, customer or manager of the property about the stain. In addition to the verbal and visual notification, write the information on your invoice and ask your customer to sign the notification.

If they refuse to sign the notification, then it is best to not proceed with the job. They may or may not have known the stain was there; but if they are unwilling to sign, then you may be setting yourself up for a costly situation.

Most of the customers we service would never think of being a DIY, however, it is possible. Therefore, it must be considered as a potential hazard.

Related information on the Bane-Clene web site;

Thank you for reading Bane’s Blog®.

Please read the latest issue of the Clene-Times® at https://www.baneclene.com/publications/.

Please visit our new and improved web site at https://www.baneclene.com.

The Bane-Clene® Team.

Friday, July 14, 2017

Weeding Out Spots

Most of us have spent time pulling weeds in our gardens or flower beds. We obviously all know to be successful the weed must be pulled root and all. We all also know what happens if we don't, the weed grows back in a short period of time.

Spots are like weeds, if not treated properly they come back. Spots are not always "spilled" onto carpets. Substances such as grease, oil and other foreign "gunk" are often tracked onto carpets without immediate detection. These foreign matters then attract dirt from additional foot traffic or airborne particles and form a spot on the carpet. During normal extractions and possible pre-spray, this spot is removed from the surface. But, unless the "root" or origin of the spot is treated with proper techniques and or spotters, the spot will "grow" back again.

Be prepared to inquire with your customer what may have caused the spots and if known, treat accordingly. If the origin is unknown, then give the spot extra treatment anyway. Products such as Citrus APS™, Saf-T-Solv™, Red Relief® and Stain Magicare just a few of the products available to keep that spot from "growing" back. The extra effort spent now may prevent a call back and an unhappy customer.

We offer a variety of Videos on spotting that are available for you to view on our web-site. The link is listed below.

Spotting video link is at https://www.baneclene.com/ProSpotGuide/Content.aspx?xps=NTEx

Related information on the Bane-Clene web site:

Thank you for reading Bane’s Blog®.

Please read the latest issue of the Clene-Times® at https://www.baneclene.com/publications/.

Please visit our new and improved web site at https://www.baneclene.com.

The Bane-Clene® Team.

Friday, July 07, 2017

Do It Right The First Time

Most problems arise in the cleaning business from lack of adequate communication between yourself and your customer, rather than an inadequate cleaning job.

The customer should be alerted to the expected time of arrival and any changes to the schedule should be communicated immediately. Once on the job, proper time should be taken to evaluate the areas or materials to be cleaned. Any apparent problems, such as severe stains, tears, open seams, frayed material, etc. should be noted on the invoice and discussed with the customer. It is also a good idea to have the customer acknowledge any issues with their signature on the invoice before beginning. If not properly communicated at the time of the job, these can result in a call back or worse yet a cost to repair or replace the cleaned item or area. Likewise the cost to perform your service should be communicated and acknowledged.

Price your work to be profitable, not just busy. While volume is wonderful, it sometimes produces little or no profit. Your time, knowledge and training are the main commodities of your service business. If your price is to low you may be forced to cheapen your commodity or skimp on time. You do not want your service to be predicated by "the time on the job" rather than the "quality of your work".

Our companies will not have more time tomorrow to "do it again" than we have today to
"do it right the first time".

Related information on the Bane-Clene web site:

Thank you for reading Bane’s Blog®.

Please read the latest issue of the Clene-Times® at https://www.baneclene.com/publications/.

Please visit our new and improved web site at https://www.baneclene.com.

The Bane-Clene® Team.