Friday, June 28, 2019

FOCUS


Maintain your focus - we often rack our brains to find answers or solutions to the problems we face. We stare at the challenge so intently that we are blinded by it. Sometimes we need to take a step back or briefly look away to solve the problem. Also, it may help to think about a previous problem and the way you solved it; perhaps the same solution will work again.

Ever try to carry a full glass of water to your desk? If you focus on the glass itself, you are bound to spill some. However, if you focus on your objective (your desk) and orient yourself to your surroundings then you will probably not spill a drop.

So, the next time you have what seems like a daunting or insurmountable problem, remember to shift your focus. Concentrate on your objective. The answer might be just ahead of you and in plain view.

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The Bane-Clene® Team.





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Wednesday, June 26, 2019

FREE half-day class by Pro's Choice covers the basics of stain removal from carpets.


FREE half-day class by Pro's Choice covers the basics of stain removal from carpets. Give yourself an advantage over your competition!

Friday October 11, 2019 8 AM - 12 PM at the

Bane-Clene® Training Center

3940 N. Keystone Ave.

Indianapolis, IN 46205

800-4289512

This class is taught using lecture and Power Point presentation. The instructor will cover the basics and advanced techniques of stain removal. Class includes hands-on demonstrations.

IICRC Continuing Education Credits

This class has been approved for IICRC Continuing Education Credits. IICRC will assign 1/2 credit to IICRC registrants in the cleaning/restoration or inspection or master categories.

The class is split into 4 basic categories:

  1. Synthetic Food Dyes: Stains containing man made dye - Examples: Kool-Aid®, Fruit Punch, Colored Candy, Cough Syrup, etc.
  2. Organic Stains: Stains from a natural source - Examples: Wood Furniture, Mustard, Coffee, Mold, Tea, Urine, etc.
  3. Petroleum based Stains: Petroleum Derivative - Examples: Gum, Grease, Tar, Ink, Adhesive, Glue, etc.
  4. Protein based stains (Biological): Stains originating from body secretion - Examples: Vomit, Blood, Feces, Urine, etc.

This class also covers more advanced topics like combination stains, bleach spot repair and reappearing stains.

To register....Call Toll-Free....800 428 9512

EARLY REGISTRATION IS ENCOURAGED AS SPACE IS LIMITED!

Pro's Choice Spot and Stain Removal Products Covered Include:

Bane-Clene Pros Choice Spotting Class

Related Spotting Information and Articles:

Related Spot and Stain Removal Videos:



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Friday, June 21, 2019

COOPERATIVE EMPLOYEES


The majority of the time your employees will do as they have been instructed without questions. However, there are times when they may seem uncooperative. This does not necessarily mean they are blatantly ignoring you. They may just have questions or be confused by your instructions. Be patient, listen to them and handle the situation with understanding. Usually all it takes is to explain things a little better or differently.

When your employees do something wrong or question your instructions, there’s nothing to be gained by losing your cool. The proper thing to do is stay relaxed and calm. Ask them questions and listen. Find out why they did it. They may feel that what they did was right. Therefore, you need to explain to them the way you want things done. While they may not totally agree with you, they should do it your way.

Very rarely your employees may deliberately do something wrong to get your attention. They may be brooding over a grievance or feel an urge to defy your authority. Yet, all they really want is a chance to talk to you and blow off some steam. Give them a chance to voice their complaints and a little incident won’t turn into a big incident.

Don’t make an issue out of a situation unless you absolutely have to. All of us can be emotional and excitable. So, before you lower the boom on someone, give them and yourself a chance to cool off. That way, no one is backing down and everyone saves face.

It will pay off in goodwill and good work and you will have cooperative employees. This will benefit them, you and your Company.

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The Bane-Clene® Team.





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Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Stone, Marble, Ceramic Tile & Grout Class


StoneTech Stone and Tile Mainenance SystemStone, Marble, Ceramic Tile & Grout Class

Comprehensive hands-on training session in cleaning, sealing, polishing and restoring marble, natural stone, ceramic tile and grout.

There is a shifting trend toward using more natural stone in both interior and exterior installations. Why not take advantage of this trend?

Thursday October 10, 2019.

Bane-Clene® Training Center

3940 N. Keystone Ave.

Indianapolis, IN 46205

Only $199 per person - includes hands-on training.
Pre-paid reservations are required!

IICRC Continuing Education Credits

This class has been approved for IICRC Continuing Education Credits and is registered as IICRC Event 1884.

IICRC will assign 1 credit to IICRC registrants in the cleaning/restoration, or inspection or master categories.

More information on the Bane-Clene Stone Class

To register....Call Toll-Free....800 428 9512

EARLY REGISTRATION IS ENCOURAGED AS SPACE IS LIMITED

Just Some of the Topics Covered:

  • What is ceramic tile.
  • What is porcelain tile?
  • What is natural stone?
  • Different types of grout.
  • Chemistry of cleaning and sealing.
  • Cleaning & sealing procedures.
  • Pre-inspection.
  • Pricing of your services.
  • Maintenance programs.
  • Equipment & chemicals needed.
  • Honing and polishing of marble to bring back the shine.
  • Determining type of stone.
  • Effect of acids and other chemicals on various types of stone.
  • Hands-on cleaning of tile.
  • What NOT TO DO.
  • Hands-on honing/polishing of marble.

Videos on How to Maintain and Restore Stone, Marble, Limestone, Natural Stone



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Bane-Clene Paper CatalogFree packet of information about Bane-Clene can be obtained by calling toll-free 1-800-428-9512 (U.S. ONLY!). Your information packet will include a full color catalog and price addendum. Packets will arrive in approximately 2 weeks through standard United States Mail.

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Friday, June 14, 2019

Find The Right Answer

One measure of a good owner is the extent to which their associates feel free to question their point of view by suggesting alternatives.

It isn’t exactly comforting to have someone disagree with you, especially about something to which you have already given considerable thought. It implies you might be wrong or at least not as right as someone else.

The owner who considers multiple solutions to a problem is more apt to find the right answer as opposed to the person who only considers one. Also, it is the mark of a good owner who encourages their associates to present their ideas.

Good owners recognize the danger of a negative reaction from one of their employees, if that person suggests an alternative idea and that idea is quickly dismissed. They are aware enough to know they are not going to be right all of the time. That is why they want these opposing points of view as a potential way to avoid or correct mistakes.

Many employees need encouragement to speak up. Give it to them by:

  • Hearing them out when they have something to say.
  • Asking their opinion before you have formed yours.
  • Not being argumentative or taking personal offense at different points of view.
  • Showing in your attitude and actions that you value a person who speaks up.

Letting people express their opinions does not reduce your authority. Neither does it keep you from insisting on 100 percent once a final decision has been made. It simply means you are willing to use everybody’s input to reach the best answer.

Flag DauyToday is Flag Day..Please fly yours proudly!

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The Bane-Clene® Team.




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Wednesday, June 12, 2019

Bane-Clene Institute Management 3-Day Training School for Professional Carpet Cleaners


The Bane-Clene Institute 3-Day Management Training School for Professional Carpet Cleaners

A to Z complete instructions on setting up and operating a cleaning business.

Bane-Clene Institute is a unique carpet, rug and upholstery cleaning training school devoted to the concept that ‘nothing is constant except change.’ Content of classes actually changes every month to incorporate the latest developments in the economy and the carpet cleaning industry. The three-day carpet cleaning classes are held with an intense classroom and hands-on curriculum. Highly skilled instructors cover a myriad of subjects. Every class is based on the actual experiences of our service business in Indianapolis.

One of hundreds of graduating classes at Bane-Clene Institute
One of hundreds of graduating classes at Bane-Clene Institute

Monday through Wednesday October 7-9, 2019.
Bane-Clene® Training Center
3940 N. Keystone Ave.
Indianapolis, IN 46205

Pre-paid reservations are required!

More information on the Bane-Clene Business Management School including fee information

To register....Call Toll-Free....800 428 9512
EARLY REGISTRATION IS ENCOURAGED AS SPACE IS LIMITED

A comprehensive course covering many topics, some of which are:

3-Day Management School Video



Free Bane-Clene Information Package

Bane-Clene Paper CatalogFree packet of information about Bane-Clene can be obtained by calling toll-free 1-800-428-9512 (U.S. ONLY!). Your information packet will include a full color catalog and price addendum. Packets will arrive in approximately 2 weeks through standard United States Mail.

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Friday, June 07, 2019

“A High Rate Of Return”

Being cheerful is not always easy and many times you do not feel that way. However, as the owner of a Carpet Cleaning Company, it is important to be cheerful.

You go to your office in a grumpy mood and you give your employees short somewhat nasty greetings. What does that say about you and what does that do to them? They may have been in a good mood and now feeding off of your mood they become grumpy also. Moods whether good or bad are like boomerangs. What you send out comes back.

Conversely you go into your office in a positive and upbeat mood and you send that out. So what happens is that all your employees feel your mood and what boomerangs back is positive and upbeat. So always try to send out good vibes whether you feel that way or not.

There are targets everywhere. Whether it is your employees, customers or anyone you come in contact with, what mood you send out will boomerang back. The business of getting back something for what you give is practical, especially when the something will benefit you.

It is what we call in business a high rate of return.

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Wednesday, June 05, 2019

What are in all these carpet cleaning detergents, anyway, and what do they do?



What are in all these carpet cleaning detergents, anyway, and what do they do?

Chemist examining carpet



Chemical Ingredients in Carpet Cleaning Detergents

Here is a list of the most common chemicals used in carpet cleaning detergents in alphabetical order:

  • Alkaline builders
  • Anti-caking agents (powders)
  • Anti-redeposition agent
  • Bleaching agents
  • Corrosion inhibitors
  • Coupling agents
  • Dyes
  • Emulsifiers
  • Encapsulating Agents - Crystallizing chemicals
  • Enzyme
  • Fillers - water, if it’s a liquid cleaner; salt or salt cake if it’s a powder.
  • Foaming or defoaming agents
  • Fragrance (perfume)
  • Optical brighteners
  • pH Buffers
  • Preservative
  • Sequestering agents (water softeners)
  • Solvents
  • Surfactants
  • Thickening agents (liquids)

Hot Water Extraction Cleaning (“steam cleaning”) detergents fall into two obvious categories: powder and liquid. Powders are usually more effective cleaning agents with lower use cost than liquids, while liquids are more easily formulated for lower pH and are more easily handled, but are usually mostly water. All other things being equal, the higher the pH, the better the cleaning; the lower the pH, the better the stain removal. Bane-Clene’s LCA®-256 is a true neutral pH detergent. PCA™ Formula 5 has the lowest pH of our powders (9.2 at 0.4 oz./gal.), yet is a better detergent for most applications due to its higher level of Emulon®. For strictly commercial work, PCA™ Formula 4, with its pH of about 11 at 0.4 oz./gal., is even more effective.

Alkaline builders control the pH for best cleaning. They include the following:

  • Soda Ash (Sodium Carbonate):

    Most powdered cleaning agents contain high levels of soda ash because it’s cheaper than most water-soluble alkaline builders.

    But, Soda ash reacts with calcium water hardness to form Calcium Carbonate scale. This scale can clog nozzles, scale up the stator (resulting in failure) and leave the carpet fibers dull from a hazy film.

    Soda ash is primarily used to cut costs and absorb liquid ingredients such as surfactants.

    There is no soda ash added to PCA Formula 5 or PCA Formula 4.
  • Sodium Bicarbonate (baking soda):

    Sodium bicarbonate is sometimes used in milder, near neutral powdered detergents. This is seldom used in carpet cleaning detergents.
  • Borax:

    While borax may be found in some laundry detergents, I’ve never seen it used in carpet detergents because it’s not very soluble in water.
  • Sodium Metasilicate:

    Sodium Metasilicate has a very high pH (over 12) in water and imparts corrosion inhibition to aluminum.

    It is commonly used to make the detergent effective against cooking grease by saponifying the grease (turning it into soap).

    There is no silicate added to PCA Formula 5, PCA Formula 4, Preface® traffic lane spotter or Olefin Preconditioner.

    But, it is a very important ingredient in Super LCA™ and TLS® 2000 for greater effectiveness against heavily soiled carpet and greasy restaurant carpets. TLS 2000, a liquid high-pH pre-spray, contains sodium metasilicate and a solvent to help cut through cooking grease in restaurants. The pH of TLS 2000 at its recommended concentration is about 13, so it is definitely not intended for use on stain-resist residential nylon or on upholstery. However, it is extremely effective in cutting through the stubborn oils so often attached to olefin (polypropylene) fibers. We specifically designed TLS 2000 for restaurant carpets with heavy grease and other problem commercial carpets.

    But, Sodium Metasilicate has some drawbacks. It reacts with water hardness to form a scale similar to that from soda ash,is much finer and is not easily removable with acid. Affected parts and nozzles frequently must be replaced rather than simply cleaned. It dissolves very slowly which can lead to clogging of the unit.
  • Phosphates:

    Trisodium Phosphate, Disodium Phosphate, Tetrasodium Pyrophosphate and Tetrapotassium Pyrophosphate are very soluble high pH builders and grease cutters that also increase cleaning power to carpet cleaning detergents.

Anti-caking agents:

  • Anticaking agents are additives placed in powdered or granulated materials, such as powdered detergents and even table salt and baking powder to prevent the formation of lumps (caking).
  • Without anticaking agents, a powdered detergent can quickly turn into a hard block that’s hard to dissolve.
  • Anti-caking agents include sodium aluminosilicate, calcium carbonate, calcium silicate and precipitated silica products.

Anti-redeposition agents

  • A good detergent has to contain suspending agents or anti-deposition agents which keep the soil particles “suspended” in the detergent solution until the solution is pulled out of the carpet by the vacuum and air movement action.
  • Without good suspension, you will frequently have streaking, resulting in having to go back and reclean.

Bleaching agents

  • Bleaching agents are either OXIDIZING or REDUCING.
  • An oxidizing bleach is a chemical that gains electrons and causes the oxidation of another substance. That is, an oxidizing bleach removes color by adding oxygen (or chlorine) to a dye structure.
  • Examples of oxidizing bleaches are hydrogen peroxide, chlorine bleach (sodium hypochlorite), sodium perborate, sodium persulfate and sodium percarbonate.
  • Sodium persulfate and sodium percarbonate are the most common bleaches added to powdered detergents. They help remove stains and brighten the fabric. Powders containing oxidizing bleaches must be kept from moisture when not in use.
  • A reducing bleach is a chemical that loses electrons and removes oxygen from a compound.
  • Examples of reducing bleaches are sodium thiosulfate (photographer’s hypo), titanium stripper, sodium bisulfite and sodium hydrosulfite.
  • Reducing bleaches are often used in upholstery and rug “shampoos” to remove “yellowing” and to prevent “browning” of sensitive wool and cotton fibers.

Corrosion inhibitors:

  • Corrosion inhibitors are sometimes added to detergents to prevent corrosion of aluminum, steel and brass parts.
  • The most common corrosion inhibitor used is sodium metasilicate which also serves as an alkaline builder as mentioned earlier.
  • Corrosion inhibitors for brass, such as Benzotriazole and Amino-Alcohols, are sometimes added to detergents.

Coupling agents:

  • One of the problems in formulating a liquid detergent is that the chemist is putting incompatible ingredients that hate each other in a concentrated form in water.
  • Without a “coupling agent,” the liquid detergent will separate into layers. In some detergents, if you heat up the concentrate, you will see this occur.
  • The most common coupling agents are sodium xylene sulfonate and its relatives and phosphate esters.
  • Coupling agents rarely contribute to cleaning power.

Dyes:

  • While very rarely added to powdered detergents, dyes are normally added to liquid detergents.
  • The primary practical reason to add a dye to a detergent is to alert the user which product they are using. Sometimes we’ll hear a carpet cleaner tell another cleaner to go get the “green” or the “blue” stuff out of the van!
  • The biggest problem with dyes is that they can be unstable and lose their color, especially when exposed to heat and light.

Emulsifiers:

  • Emulsification is the process of removing those oils that do not saponify; i.e., they don’t react with alkali and turn into soap.
  • These oils are are motor oils, exhaust fumes, common pollution oils, lubricants, silicones, furniture polish, sun tan lotion, tobacco smoke residue, lubricating grease, oils from skin and pet hair, etc.
  • Emulsifiers are molecules that are also “surfactants” covered in more detail later in this article.
  • Emulsifiers help remove oils into water because they have two “ends” on the molecule. One “end” loves water and the other “end” loves oil.
  • The oil-soluble end of an emulsifier penetrates into the oil with the water-soluble portion sticks out into the water. Hundreds of these molecules surround this oil particle, break it into smaller particles and pull it into the water by changing the very nature of both the water and the oil.
  • A familiar example of an emulsion would be salad oil. If you mix vinegar and oil, you get two layers. No matter how hard you shake it or heat it, it separates into two layers! Yet, you can go to the grocery store and find all kinds of salad dressings that don’t separate! Why? An emulsifier is added!
  • The emulsifier Bane-Clene uses in most of its carpet cleaning detergents is Emulon®.

Encapsulating agents or crystallizing agents:

  • Crystallizing agents are added to some detergents to reduce resoiling of the carpet after cleaning.
  • Resoiling agents are usually resins such as styrene maleic acid derivatives or polymers.
  • What most people mean by “resoiling” is that the carpet became visibly dirty more quickly than it should have after it was cleaned.
  • Encapsulants prevent re-attachment of soil to carpet fiber during the extraction cleaning process. During the drying process, they combine with any remaining wicking residue to form non-sticky crystal structures.
  • Bane-Clene supplies three encapsulating products from Pro's Choice:

    Brush & Bonnet Low-Moisture Encapsulating Soil Crystallization Bonnet Cleaner,

    SCR Soil Crystallization Rinse Encapsulation Extraction Carpet Cleaner and

    ARA Anti-Resoiling Agent

Enzymes:

  • Protease enzymes are added to some detergents and traffic lane spotters to help remove fatty soils such as cooking grease. They are useful in cleaning restaurants.
  • Enzymes act as “catalysts” to help break down organic material for easier removal.
  • There are six basic types of enzymes for cleaners:

    Protease - degrades protein based soils

    Amylase - degrades starch based or carbohydrate soils

    Cellulase - breaks down cotton fibers to release soils

    Lipase - degrades fat-based soils

    Mannanase - degrades food-based stains and

    Pectinase - degrades fruit-based stains
  • Bane-Clene supplies two cleaning products containing enzymes:

    Pro-Zyme+ Grease Digester and Protein Prespray for restaurant, kitchen, dining room carpets and

    Chemspec® Enz-All™ Enzymatic Prespray, Heavy Soil and Grease Digester.

Fillers:

  • If the detergent is a liquid, it is mostly water - which does nothing! That’s why powdered detergents are more economical.
  • Fillers used in powders do not contribute to cleaning but add “bulk” making you think you have 20 pounds of detergent when you really only have 10 pounds.
  • Examples of powder fillers are salt (sodium chloride) and salt cake (sodium sulfate).
  • Fillers are not used in any of the Bane-Clene powdered cleaners.

Foaming or defoaming agents:

  • FOAM is a common problem in extraction carpet cleaning. Foam in the vacuum hose can increase drying time and greatly reduce cleaning effectiveness because it has, in effect, reduced the vacuum hose to 1/2 inch in diameter! Additionally, excessive foam can cause damage to the vacuum pump and other equipment.
  • Silicone emulsion defoamers are sometimes added to carpet cleaning extraction detergents to counteract the foaming properties of the emulsifiers and surfactants used.
  • Carpet shampoos, which are discussed later in this article, must be very foamy and have very stable foam. The most common ingredient is sodium lauryl sulfate, a very sticky compound.

Fragrance (perfume):

  • Fragrances, obviously, do not contribute to cleaning, but they can leave the room smelling “clean and fresh”.
  • Except for anti-allergen cleaning products, fragrances are nearly always in the formulas of carpet cleaning detergents and, quite often, the cleaning technician may add a separate fragrance to the cleaning solution.
  • Bane-Clene does supply Per-Scent® fragrance that can be added to the cleaning solution.
  • Bane-Clene also supplies Air Fresh Odor Counteractant made by Pro’s Choice.

Optical brighteners

  • Optical brighteners are added by some manufacturers who don’t know that carpet manufacturers don’t approve of carpet cleaners containing optical brighteners.
  • Optical brighteners are highly specialized dyes which absorb invisible ultraviolet light and re-emit it as visible light, making the carpet appear brighter than it really is.
  • They are used by some carpet cleaning chemical manufacturers who don’t realize that their use will permanently cause the carpet to turn yellow. Since these are dyes, there is no cure for this problem.
  • Bane-Clene has NEVER used optical brighteners in its products.

pH Buffers:

  • The purpose of pH buffers is to help the cleaning solution maintain its pH level as its alkaline ingredients are neutralized by acidic soils.
  • Most of the “alkaline builders” covered earlier serve also as pH buffers.

Preservative:

  • Preservatives are chemicals added to some detergents to inhibit bacterial and fungal growth.
  • Microbial contamination in a cleaning product can lead to a number of problems including the development of “off-odors”, development of “off appearance” including color changes and opacity changes, and loss of performance.
  • Preservatives are more commonly used in near neutral household detergents than higher pH commercial products.
  • Paraben preservatives are found in nearly of cosmetics.
  • Benzisothiazolinone is the most commonly used preservative in cleaning products, usually around 0.1-0.3% concentration.

Sequestering agents:

  • Sequestering agents or chelating agents (water softening agents) are needed to keep the detergent more active in hard water and to help prevent scaling and clogging due to hard water.
  • Sequestering agents essentially surround the calcium and magnesium ions in hard water to keep them from keeping the detergent from working effectively and prevent “soap scum” film.
  • Virtually all carpet cleaning products contain chelating agents.
  • One drawback to sequestering agents is that they also “love” copper and brass and shorten the life-span of your brass fittings.
  • Additionally, since marble and limestone are calcium carbonate, detergents containing high levels of water softeners will dull marble and limestone floors and countertops.
  • The most common chelating agents used in carpet cleaning detergents are sodium citrate, EDTA (ethylene diamine tetraactic acid), NTA (Nitrilotriacetic acid) and Polyphosphates.

Solvents:

  • The most common solvents used in liquid carpet cleaning products are Butyl Cellosolve, Butyl Carbitol, Citrus, Propylene Glycol Ether and M-Pyrol.
  • Butyl Cellosolve is a water-soluble solvent that attacks both water-soluble soils and water-insoluble oils and greases and has a very characteristic odor that most users find irritating.
  • Butyl Cellosolve is a unique solvent that is soluble in water yet is so strong that it is commonly used in wax strippers, heavy-duty ready-to-use cleaners, all-purpose cleaners, degreasers, wax strippers, bath and tile cleaners and most window cleaners.
  • Additionally, some prespray additive products, such as Energy Prespray Solvent Booster from Pro’s Choice may contain aliphatic solvents such as mineral spirits.

Surfactants:

  • Surfactants (surface active agents) are the raw materials which really make the detergent work and are are the most important ingredient in detergents.
  • Surfactants are compounds that lower the surface tension (or interfacial tension) between two liquids (such as between a cleaning agent and oil) or between a liquid and a solid (such as dirt).
  • In wet extraction cleaning, speed of action, emulsification and good wetting are essential.
  • Additionally, the surfactants used must be low foaming.
  • Ethoxylated Alcohol, Alkyl Phenoxy Polyethoxy Ethanols and Alkyl Glucosides (made from oils and sugar) are the most common “nonionic” surfactants and Linear Alkyl Benzene Sulfonate (LAS), Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Sodium Laureth Sulfate are the most common “anionic” surfactants.
  • In anionic surfactants, the head of the molecule is negatively charged. This particular type of surfactant is very good at removing oily dirt and stains unless used in very hard water. The minerals keep the anionic surfactant from working properly.
  • With hard water, better cleaning results are with non-ionic surfactants. These surfactant molecules have no electrical charge.
  • Frequently, anionic and nonionic surfactants are used together in a cleaning product to complement and boost cleaning action.
  • Surfactants allow water and grease to mix
  • Surfactants: are wetting agents that lower the surface tension of a liquid and lower the interfacial tension between two liquids.
  • Each surfactant molecule has a hydrophilic (water-loving) head that is attracted to water molecules AND a hydrophobic (water-hating) tail that repels water and simultaneously attaches itself to oil and grease in dirt.
  • With anionic surfactants, the head is negatively charged. This is the most widely used type of surfactant for laundering, dishwashing liquids and shampoos because of their excellent cleaning properties.
  • Non-ionic surfactants do not have an electrical charge, which makes them resistant to water hardness deactivation. They are excellent grease and oil removers. The most commonly used non-ionic surfactants are ethers of fatty alcohols.
  • The primary surfactant used in Bane-Clene products is Emulon®.

Thickening agents:

  • Thickening agents are sometimes added to make the liquid detergent seem more concentrated than they really are.

How do the ingredients in carpet shampoos and dry foams differ from those used in warm water extraction? Carpet shampoo products must have the following characteristics, which dictate their ingredients:

  • Very high foam levels to reduce wetting.
  • Very stable foam.
  • High lubricity to reduce damage to the carpet fibers from the brushes.
  • Dry to a non-sticky residue (in theory).

Therefore, a carpet shampoo must contain a very foamy chemical as its main ingredient. The most common is Sodium Lauryl Sulfate. Sometime when you’re taking a shower or bath, take a look at the ingredient statement on your hair shampoo bottle. It will say “Contains Sdium Lauryl Sulfate, Sodium Laureth Sulfate” or something similar.

Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and its relatives , Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES), and Ammonium Laurel Sulfate (ALS) exhibit a very high and very stable foam. They are very poor detergents (would you want your hair shampoo to be a heavy-duty industrial strength butyl degreaser?). The problem is that they dry to a soft, sticky residue that causes resoiling. Because of the resoiling problem, carpet shampoos will also have an anti-resoiling additive such as a resin, but these additives only reduce rather than eliminate resoiling. Because shampoos are actually poor detergents and, basically, simply bury the dirt, they frequently contain high levels of optical brighteners. They may contain solvents such as alcohol or Butyl Cellosolve.

Related Carpet Cleaning Information:

Related Carpet Cleaning Products:


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Copyright: Bane-Clene® Corp.

Date Published: June 5, 2019

Revised by Don Terry: June 5, 2019


VIDEO: Bane-Clene Carpet Cleaning Detergents and Emulsifiers

Presented by Bane-Clene’s chemist, this video shows how PCA Formula 5, Booster and Per-Scent are used in a Bane-Clene truckmount carpet cleaning machine for the best carpet cleaning you’ve ever seen.